Save the Date: 8th Living Knowledge Conference 2018 in Budapest, Hungary, 30 May – 1 June

Logo_LK8-ConferenceThe 2018 edition of the LK Conference will be hosted by the Corvinus Business School, Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary, from 30 May to 1 June.

The chosen theme is “Enriching Science and Community Engagement”

The LK8 Conference is aimed at academics, practitioners, activists, social innovators, research funders, science educators and communicators, citizen scientists, policy makers, non-governmental organisations, artists, interested community groups and citizens.

The last conference hosted more than 250 participants from 25 countries.

Among others the following questions are going to be discussed at the conference:

• How to build on and enrich the public engagement in research practices (through RRI, Open Science, Open Innovation, Science Shops, citizen science, participatory governance, community-based research, inclusion of community members in advisory boards, etc.)?

• What are the most valued aspects of community-based engaged scholarship?

• How to assess impacts in science-community partnerships?

• How to nurture the debate about the place and role of “society in science” / “science in society,” and how to encourage the systematic and ethical involvement of civil society actors and their societal concerns in research and innovation processes?

• Science event organisers, educators, community organisers carry a lot of the weight in achieving successful ‘engagement’ – yet, many of their efforts, practices, and challenges go unnoticed, unacknowledged, or taken for granted (organisationally and monetarily). Sometimes leading to burnout, this lack of recognition kills creativity and the very drive of and purpose of engagement: what really matters gets swallowed by bureaucratic procedures, unfulfilled expectations, and lack of time/spaces for replenishment. What new arrangements exist or can be created/practiced to address this at the personal, organisational, and funding levels?

• How / do we fulfill our promises of community engagement? What are the critiques and expectations from institutions aiming at community engagement? How are these engaged with / addressed?

The conference website with further information will be online soon: www.livingknowledge.org/lk8.

Contact: Réka Matulay

Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization, Course 2: Sept.18 to Nov.12

Registration for Course 2 of the Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization is now open! “Engage: Building capacity to understand and use relevant evidence”, will be offered online from September 18 to November 12, 2017.

Register by July 28, 2017 and take advantage of early bird savings!

The course

The creation of productive contexts for knowledge mobilization (KMb) requires acting on the factors enhancing or limiting individual, organizational and societal capacity for using and sharing evidence. The course focuses on the processes and products that support target audiences in engaging with new evidence, and build capacity to identify, make sense of, and apply relevant evidence.

“Engage” is the second of three online courses offered in the University of Guelph Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization. Courses are targeted towards professionals in the social sciences, human services and health sectors. They can be completed in any order, with one course offered each semester.

Instructor: Travis Sztainert, Ph.D., Knowledge Broker and Content Specialist for the Gambling Research Exchange Ontario

For more information, visit us at www.knowledgemobilization.ca or get in touch with Caroline Duvieusart-Déry

The Knowledge Mobilization Certificate program is excellent and has provided me with better tools to assist researchers in communicating their knowledge to a broader community of interest. The course is well designed, highly practical and the instructors are knowledgeable and responsive to student needs. I would recommend this program to anyone who is interested in ensuring that research is shared beyond the academy.
-Participant, Course 1 of the Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization

Arts-Based Approaches to KT in Health Policy Development Webinar with Susan Cox – July 7, 2017

For full details on this webinar and to register, please visit https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/kt-connects-webinar-susan-cox-tickets-34518886920

KT Connects: Knowledge Translation Webinar Series

The Michael Smith Foundation of Health Research and Arthritis Research Canada have partnered to co-develop and host a series of monthly expert-led, beginner-level KT training webinars with the goal of developing a sustainable resource for researchers and trainees to learn knowledge and skills that will enable them to develop KT practice in their work.

Title: Arts-based approaches to KT in health policy development

Speaker: Susan M. Cox, Ph.D Associate Professor
Acting Director, The W. Maurice Young Centre for Applied Ethics
School of Population and Public Health
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC

In this webinar, participants will be introduced to the range of literary, performative and visual methods used in arts-based approaches to KT. Specific challenges and opportunities related to using these innovative KT approaches in the field of health policy development will be considered through closer examination of a series of examples drawn from my own as well as colleagues’ work. The webinar will conclude with reflections on ethical and methodological issues arising and tips on where to turn for resources and support.

Learning objectives:

1. Explore the range of arts-based approaches to KT

2. Identify challenges and opportunities related to using arts-based approaches in health policy development

3. Consider examples of KT projects utilizing live theatre, found poetry and visual methods to inform health policy development.

4. Reflect on ethical and methodological issues arising from examples

Webinar poster

Register now at https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/kt-connects-webinar-susan-cox-tickets-34518886920

UK KMb Forum 2018 – Save the Date!

This week’s guest post was first published on the UKKMbF website on February 28, 2017 and it reposted here with permission

UKKMb Forum logoWe are delighted to announce that the UK Knowledge Mobilisation Forum will be returning on 7th-8th March, 2018 in Bristol.

The UK Knowledge Mobilisation Forum is an annual event for all those with a passion for ensuring that knowledge makes a positive difference to society. The Forum brings together practitioners, researchers, students, administrators and public representatives who are engaged in the art and science of sharing knowledge and ensuring that it can be used. The Forum is designed as a space for learning and reflection, providing an opportunity for sharing knowledge, experiences and methods and access to some of the most up to date thinking and practice in the field. Expect conversations, creativity and collaborative learning…and if you’re wondering what we mean by ‘knowledge’ – we are as interested in practical know-how, skills and experience as in research findings or evaluation data.

We will be announcing details of bookings and call for content later in the year, so for now please just hold the date in your diary.

Follow us on Twitter to keep up to date with the latest news – @UKKMbF

McMaster University Takes Home 2017 SSHRC Award of Excellence for Communications

This week’s guest post first appeared on www.newwire.ca and is reposted here with permission.

Canadian Public Relations Society-McMaster University takes homeResearch Snaps project presents social sciences and humanities research by asking simple questions and engaging readers in the results

KELOWNA, BC, May 31, 2017 /CNW/ – What is this research about? What did the researchers find? How can people use it? With plain and simple language, McMaster University’s Research Snaps digital media campaign, which features over 80 projects, has helped make social sciences and humanities research more accessible to Canadians. It has earned this year’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Award of Excellence, presented at this year’s annual Canadian Public Relations Society (CPRS) gala on May 30, 2017.

“McMaster University’s Research Snaps project highlights the contribution of social sciences and humanities research in simple, straightforward terms. It is a wonderful example not only of how academic institutions can convey insights about today’s complex social, cultural and economic issues but, perhaps more importantly, engage Canadians in mobilizing that research,” said Ted Hewitt, President, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

The SSHRC Award of Excellence was created in 2016 to showcase the communications efforts of postsecondary institutions in promoting the benefits and impacts of social sciences and humanities research. This research is used by people across Canada to better understand our society, innovate and build prosperity.

“The SSHRC Award of Excellence recognizes the important role that communications plays in making social sciences and humanities research accessible, relevant and easy to understand,” said Kim Blanchette, National Board President of CPRS. “This research improves our quality of life as Canadians and the CPRS congratulates this year’s award recipients who truly represent excellence in public relations practice.”

The award was one of several prizes in public relations and communications management presented to industry professionals at the CPRS gala.

For more information about the winning project, visit Research Snaps on McMaster University’s website.

About CPRS
Founded in 1948, the Canadian Public Relations Society (CPRS) is a not-for-profit organization whose members are engaged in the practice, management or teaching of public relations. Members work to maintain the highest standards and to share a uniquely Canadian experience in public relations. CPRS is a federation of more than 2500 members across 14 Member Societies based in major cities or organized province-wide. For more information, visit its website: cprs.ca.

About SSHRC
The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada is the federal research funding agency that promotes and supports postsecondary-based research and research training in the humanities and social sciences. By focusing on developing Talent, generating Insights and forging Connections across campuses and communities, SSHRC strategically supports world-leading initiatives that reflect a commitment to ensuring a better future for Canada and the world. Created in 1977, SSHRC reports to Parliament through the Minister of Science.

SOURCE Canadian Public Relations Society

For further information: Karen Dalton, Executive Director, Canadian Public Relations Society, 416-239-7034, kdalton@cprs.ca; Christopher Walters, Director of Communications, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, 613-992-4283, Christopher.Walters@sshrc-crsh.gc.ca

Research Impact Canada wins Directors’ Award from CARA

This post was first published on May 8, 2017 in YFile, York University’s News. It is reposted here with permission.

York University, on behalf of Research Impact Canada (formerly the ResearchImpact network), was awarded the Directors’ Award for Inter-Institutional Collaboration from the Canadian Association of Research Administrators (CARA), at the CARA national meeting in Winnipeg. The award was announced May 8.

David PhippsDavid Phipps, executive director, Research & Innovation Services, accepted the award for his work, alongside others, in Research Impact Canada. For a decade now, this network — a group of 12 universities across the country — has been engaged in knowledge mobilization with measurable impacts. It is committed to maximizing the impact of academic research for social, economic, environmental and health benefits.

“The CARA awards recognize excellence in research management and administration in Canada. Research Impact Canada has broken down barriers to collaboration across Canada and its members have demonstrated leadership and creativity in working collaboratively and effectively to create new knowledge mobilization tools and practices that maximize the impact of university research. We are delighted to recognize them with this award,” says Frances Chandler, CARA president.

Robert Hache“We believe that new knowledge, often developed through community-based partnerships, makes a real difference in society and leads to more informed decision-making for public policy, professional practice and social programs,” says Vice-President Research & Innovation, Robert Haché.

In this award, CARA recognizes Research Impact Canada’s remarkable contribution to inter-institutional collaboration and sharing, including developing knowledge mobilization tools that are adopted beyond the network, engaging in joint ventures and hosting major events that facilitate collaboration. This group embodies leadership and creativity in working collaboratively and effectively to achieve a shared goal in research management.
York University continues for a second and final term as the lead institution in Research Impact Canada for 2017-20.

For more information, visit the Research Impact Canada website.

Event: March 29: The Australian KT Experience and Our Move to the Impact Agenda

The Knoweldge Mobilization Unit at York University looks forward to welcoming Tamika Heiden to YorkU for a talk this Wednesday. Please join us if you are in the area!

The Australian KT Experience and Our Move to the Impact Agenda

March 29, 2017

Tamika Heiden, Knowledge Translation Australia

Tamika HeidenThis talk has been organized by the Knowledge Mobilization Unit at York University. Knowledge mobilization
helps turn research into action.

Tamika Heiden, of Knowledge Translation Australia, has been driving change, advocating for Knowledge Translation (KT), and training researchers and research support staff in KT processes for the past three years. In a country yet to embrace KT and Impact, Tamika has been preparing for the inevitable change to research funding and reward. In 2017, the Australian government is undertaking its first Engagement and Impact Assessment Pilot, with the view to ongoing impact assessment beginning in 2018.

Join Tamika as she shares the KT practices that are happening in Australia and gives insights into the current research impact and engagement evaluation landscape. This conversational style session will look at Tamika’s entrepreneurial approach to KT, examine current KT roles and activities, and discuss the role of KT in the Australian Impact and Engagement agenda moving forward.

Date:
Wednesday, March 29

Time:
1:00pm to 3:00pm

Location:
Room 519, Kaneff Tower
York University, Keele Campus
4700 Keele Street, Toronto

Knowledge Mobilization Officer Position Opening at York University

We are excited to share this job opportunity for a Knowledge Mobilization Officer to lead the VISTA, Vision: Science to Applications program at York University. Here is a summary of the position:

YorkULogoVer(large)Application Deadline: April 5, 2017 Full position details

Purpose:
Under the general supervision of the Manager of Knowledge Mobilization, the Knowledge Mobilization Officer (KMb Officer) works within knowledge mobilization team and more specifically, will be the knowledge mobilization lead for VISTA, the Vision: Science to Applications program. The knowledge mobilization team is part of Innovation York, the innovation unit within the Division of the Vice-President, Research & Innovation (VPRI) at York University.

KMb Officer coordinates the various KMb functions in order to provide effective and efficient service and support to VISTA faculty members, trainees, students, and external VISTA partners in the administration of the University’s practices relating to knowledge mobilization. KMb Officer will advance knowledge mobilization activities for VISTA researchers, specifically VISTA core members by: creating and maintaining effective working relationships with VISTA faculty, trainees and students in order to understand ongoing research projects, assist in creating opportunities for research partnerships with external organizations, work with new and existing research partnerships, and assist with the creation and dissemination of communications materials for VISTA research projects.

KMb Officer will provide outreach to policy makers and decision makers, as well as external organizations, in order to disseminate communications materials and maximize the impact of VISTA research.

Education:
Minimum undergraduate degree is required, preferably in the sciences or communication/journalism.

Experience:
Minimum two years of experience working with a specific knowledge mobilization or communications mandate, either in a university research administrative environment or in the equivalent in government, NGO, community or voluntary agency, in a research or policy environment.

Skills:
Excellent presentation skills. Ability to work independently as well as in a team environment; excellent judgment, oral and written communication, interpersonal, problem-solving and organizational skills; ability to multitask, set priorities and meet tight deadlines; strong analytical skills; professionalism, tact, sensitivity and diplomacy in interactions with internal and external constituencies; flexibility, self-directed and demonstrated initiative, creativity; high level of accuracy and attention to detail; comfort with ambiguity. Knowledge of University research and financial policies and procedures an asset. Demonstrated advanced skills in MS Office, intermediate skill and experience in web design software (such as HTML or Dreamweaver) and basic database software (such as MS Access). Demonstrated experience using and instructing on the use of social media (O3 Platform, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube) required, preferably in a research environment. Ability to work with databases and web content management systems. Demonstrated ability to use Google analytics and other web metrics.

Salary: Annual salary of $59,565 will be prorated based on the number of weeks worked.

Position Start Date: April 17, 2017 Position End Date: March 31, 2023

Application Deadline: April 5, 2017

For full position details, visit http://webapps.yorku.ca/nonacademicpostings/summary.jsp?postingnumber=10366

Éthique de la recherche et du terrain en contexte autochtone – 12 Avril

Éthique de la recherche et du terrain en contexte autochtone (aussi en webdiffusion)

https://t.co/kuHqQN6uXH

Boîte à outils des principes de la recherche en context autochtone12 Avril 2017
13h00 à 15h00

Pavillon Roger Gaudry – Université de Montréal
Salle S-116
2900, boul. Édouard-Montpetit, Montréal
Montréal (Québec) Canada H3T 1J4

Prix: Entrée libre, places limitées

L’objectif de cet atelier est d’examiner les outils existants en matière de gestion et de pratiques de la recherche de manière à respecter les aspirations des communautés et instances autochtones en matière de recherche les concernant. Lors de cet atelier, nous passerons à travers les différentes étapes permettant d’établir une relation de recherche respectueuse et équitable en vue de recueillir des données pertinentes et d’organiser un transfert de connaissances efficace.

Webdiffusion : Connectez vous pour participer à l’atelier

Avec Karine Gentelet, Suzy Basile et Nancy Gros-Louis McHugh (en visioconférence depuis Wendake)

Introduction par Pierre De Coninck (UdeM), président du comité d’études nordiques de l’Université de Montréal.

Plan de l’atelier

    Les communautés autochtones du Nord du Québec
    Concept de santé globale.
    Histoire du principe de consentement et des protocoles autochtones de recherche.
    Lignes directrices pour les recherches portant sur les femmes et lignes directrice du groupe de travail des Premiers peuples.
    Responsabilité sociale du chercheur et le transfert des connaissances.
    Boîte à outils des principes de la recherche en contexte autochtone (2015)
    Questions et discussions.

Karine Gentelet est professeure en études autochtones au Département des sciences sociales de l’Université du Québec en Outaouais. Ses champs d’intérêt portent sur la reconnaissance des droits des Peuples autochtones, l’éthique de la recherche, la responsabilité sociale des chercheurs et l’anthropologie/sociologie du droit. Dernièrement elle a codirigé la “Boîte à outils de la recherche en contexte autochtone” à laquelle participaient Suzie Basile et Nancy Gros-Louis McHugh. Elle est fortement engagée dans la promotion et la défense des droits de la personne, notamment des droits des Peuples autochtones auprès d’Amnistie Internationale Amnistie Internationale depuis 2007.

Suzie Basile est professeure à l’Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue à l’École d’études autochtones. Ses champs de spécialisation sont l’anthropologie culturelle, peuples autochtones (Premières Nations et Inuit, femmes autochtones, éthique de la recherche et développement nordique.

Nancy Gros-Louis McHugh est gestionnaire du secteur de la recherche pour la Commission de la santé et des services sociaux des Premières Nations du Québec et a piloté la mise sur pied du Protocole de recherche des Premières Nations du Québec et du Labrador.

Cet atelier vise à rejoindre :

    les étudiants-chercheurs du Programme de formation scientifique dans le Nord (PFSN),
    les chercheurs désirant amorcer ou effectuant des recherches en contexte autochtone.

Cet atelier est présenté par le Bureau Recherche – Développement – Valorisation de l’Université de Montréal.

https://t.co/kuHqQN6uXH

Recapping the Top Five Most Popular Posts of 2016 / Résumé des 5 billets les plus populaire de 2016

Here’s a look at the top five most popular blog posts in 2016.

Revoici les cinq billets qui vous ont le plus intéressés.

#1 – 165 views

SSHRC Strategic Plan Sets the Stage for Knowledge Mobilization / Le Plan stratégique du CRSH met la table pour la mobilisation des connaissances

Congratulations SSHRC on a new strategic plan. Implementing this plan will help social sciences and humanities research have an impact on the lives of Canadians.

Toutes nos félicitations pour ce nouveau plan stratégique ! Grâce à lui, la recherche en sciences humaines et sociales aura encore plus d’impact sur la vie des Canadiens et des Canadiennes.

SSHRC strategic plan image

#2 – 154 views

The Co-Produced Pathway To Impact / La Trajectoire D’impact Codéterminée

York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit regularly publishes peer reviewed articles on various aspects of institutional knowledge mobilization. The most recent publication describes a pathway from research to impact that can be used by research organizations seeking to monitor their projects as they progress towards impact.

L’Unité de mobilisation des connaissances de York produit régulièrement des articles scientifiques sur différents aspects de la mise en application du savoir universitaire. Sa publication la plus récente décrit un itinéraire permettant de passer de la recherche à l’impact, au moyen d’une démarche que les organismes de recherche peuvent employer pour superviser la progression de leurs projets vers l’impact souhaité.

CPPI from JCES

#3 – 110 views

The Who, What and How of Research Impact / L’impact de la recherche : le qui, le quoi et le comment

David Phipps has just returned from three weeks in the UK for his Fellowship funded by the Association of Commonwealth Universities. Working with his Fellowship partner, Julie Bayley (Coventry University), he became immersed in research impacts mediated through public engagement, commercialization, entrepreneurship, internationalization and knowledge exchange. This affords the opportunity for a trans-Atlantic comparison of the people who are creating and assessing the many impacts of research. You can help by participating in a survey to help us figure this out.

David Phipps rentre tout juste d’un voyage de trois semaines au Royaume-Uni, où il a avancé les travaux qu’il réalise à titre de boursier de l’Association of Commonwealth Universities. Avec sa partenaire de subvention, Julie Bayley (de la Coventry University), il s’est penché sur l’impact produit par l’engagement dans le domaine public, la commercialisation, l’entrepreneuriat, l’internationalisation et l’échange de connaissances.Cela ouvre la porte à une comparaison transatlantique des personnes qui créent et qui évaluent les multiples impacts de la recherche.Vous pouvez les aider à mettre de l’ordre dans tout cela en participant à un sondage.

Julie Bayley and David Phipps

Julie Bayley and David Phipps

#4 – 104 views

Critical Appraisal of Research Impact Pathways / Éloge critique des moyens d’amplifier l’impact de la recherche

The National Institute for Health Research (UK) and the Association of Medical Research Charities held an impact forum on April 27, 2016. We were invited to kick at some of the popular impact pathways by asking five critical questions.

Deux établissements britanniques, le National Institute for Health Research et l’Association of Medical Research Charities, organisaient un forum sur l’impact de la recherche, le 27 avril dernier. Nous avions été invités à poser cinq questions délicates afin de déboulonner les moyens populaires de mettre la recherche en action.

Pic of presentation slide

#5 – 81 views

Knowledge Mobilization, Research Impact, and the Changing Nature of Academic Work / La mobilisation des connaissances, l’impact de la recherche et la nature changeante du travail universitaire

That’s the title of a research article written by Matthew McKean, Conference Board of Canada. The article reviews the ResearchImpact network and the emerging importance of knowledge mobilization in Canada’s academic research enterprise and Canada’s inclusive innovation agenda.

Voilà le titre d’un article de fond publié par Matthew McKean, du Conference Board du Canada. L’auteur examine le Réseau Impact Recherche et l’importance de plus en plus affirmée de la mobilisation des connaissances, dans la conduite de la recherche universitaire au Canada comme dans le programme d’innovation inclusif que le pays s’est donné.

Conference Board of Canada logo

Merry Mobilizing!

Merry Mobilizing 2016

Merry Mobilizing from the Knowledge Mobilization Unit at York University!

From left to right:

David Phipps, Executive Director, Research & Innovation Services

Sarah Howe, Director, Innovation York

Rebecca Giblon, Research Translation Assistant

Krista Jensen, Knowledge Mobilization Officer

Meghan Terry, Design Communications Assistant

Michael Johnny, Manager, Knowledge Mobilization

Anneliese Poetz, Manager, NeuroDevNet KT Core

Stacie Ross, KT Assistant, NeuroDevNet KT Core

The ResearchImpact Network – What’s in It for You? / Le Réseau Impact Recherche – qu’avez-vous à y gagner ?

A few universities are considering joining the ResearchImpact network. I was asked recently to identify what a university might get for its annual membership fee of $5,000. Essentially, what is the value proposition for membership?

Quelques universités songent à se joindre au Réseau Impact Recherche. On m’a demandé récemment ce qu’une université membre pouvait attendre de son adhésion annuelle, au cout de 5 000 $. En clair : quelle est la proposition de valeur du Réseau ?

ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche (RIR) is Canada’s knowledge mobilization network with 12 universities from St. John’s to Victoria all investing in their own knowledge mobilization and related activities and all investing $5,000 annually to fund network operations. While we do not have an active recruitment drive we are always interested in speaking to universities who wish to learn from our diverse practices and contribute to the network so we can all grow our skills. What’s in it for you?

Part of the value proposition is articulated in our Strategic Plan.

Mission
• We build Canada’s capacity to be a leader in knowledge mobilization by developing and sharing best practices, services and tools, and by demonstrating to relevant stakeholders and the public the positive impacts of mobilizing knowledge.

Vision
• We will maximize the impact of university research for the social, cultural, economic, environmental, and health benefits across local and global communities.

Values
• We believe that academic research contributes to social, cultural, economic, environmental, and health benefits across local and global communities.
• We believe that the university research enterprise encompasses research, scholarship and creative activity by faculty, students and staff across all disciplines.
• We value community, industry and government partners as active participants in conducting research.
• We believe that knowledge mobilization services reflect the capacity and opportunities of institutional members.

Essentially we are a community of practice of institutional knowledge mobilizers all with different skills using different tools with different mandates in different organizational constructs. See the figure below that summarizes this diversity

RIR Unit service models

It is this diversity that is the value proposition. You will learn from other universities to bolster your own practice and help maximize the impacts of your research. Some examples of our practices – there are more:

• Memorial Univesity: Strong focus on public engagement; use of yaffle.ca as a tool for knowledge brokering
• University of New Brunswick: Social Policy Research Network with a focus on knowledge mobilization to inform provincial policy
• Université du Québec à Montréal: Services aux Collectivitées – a community based knowledge brokering function
• Carleton Univesity: 1125 @ Carleton is a Living Lab model
• York University: Central Office of Research Services model including support for knowledge mobilization strategies in grant applications; research impact assessment
• University of Guelph: Research Shop model
• Kwantlen Polytechnic University: Service learning model
• University of Victoria: Research partnership model

Your $5,000 buys you access into these different practices so you can take from the network what fits in your context.

We believe that knowledge mobilization helps universities participate more fully in the federal government’s emerging innovation agenda which is being drafted around the core concept of inclusive innovation. We can more fully participate in inclusive innovation by connecting research in all disciplines to partners from all sectors (public, private and non-profit) to create impacts on local and global citizens. RIR is the only network in the world focused on institutional knowledge mobilization to maximize the impacts of academic research.

Membership has its privileges.

For more information about please email info@researchimpact.ca or email me directly at dphipps@yorku.ca.

Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization

Certificate in knowledge mobilization

As of January 2017, the University of Guelph’s Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization will be offered entirely online. Through three eight-week courses, the program helps participants develop new skills and use various techniques to help turn knowledge into action.

Turning Knowledge into Action
Promotional Early Bird Fee offered until November 25, 2016.
Register today at www.knowledgemobilization.ca

The program

The Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization builds capacity for the transformation of knowledge into action. Participants will learn to identify and address barriers to knowledge mobilization, transfer or exchange, and use tools and techniques to facilitate the development of evidence-informed policy and practice.

The program consists of three online courses:

1. Inform: Processes of knowledge translation and dissemination (January 23 to March 19, 2017)
2. Engage: Building capacity to understand and use relevant evidence (September 18 to November 12, 2017)
3. Act: Transforming knowledge into action (January 22 to March 18, 2018)

Who should participate?

The certificate is targeted towards KMb practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and service providers working in the social sciences, human services and health sectors. We also welcome graduate students interested in building KMb skills or planning to work in one of these fields.

Instructors

The courses will be taught by experienced instructors and knowledge brokers:
Anne Bergen, Ph.D., Director, Knowledge to Action Consulting
Travis Sztainert, Ph.D., Knowledge Broker and Content Specialist at Gambling Research Exchange Ontario

For more information, visit us at www.knowledgemobilization.ca.

KMb at York 2015-2016 Annual Report Released / L’Unité de MdC de l’Université York rapport annuel pour 2015-2016

KMb at York has completed it’s Annual Report for 2015-16. The report highlights current services and recent successes and this report shared reflections on 10 years of KMb services at York University.

L’Unité de mobilisation des connaissances de l’Université York vient de terminer son rapport annuel pour 2015-2016. Ce rapport met en lumière les services offerts actuellement et les réussites les plus récentes, et propose une réflexion sur dix années de MdC à York.

2015-2016-kmb-at-yorku-annual-report-coverYou won’t have to look far to notice a central overarching theme to our Annual Report, which is recently completed and can be accessed here. The title page reflects a new logo we shared to reflect the 10 year anniversary of KMb Unit services and support at York U and for York Region and the entire Greater Toronto Area.

This 16 page report highlights our services, activities, partnerships and accomplishments over the past year and since 2006. The feature story is the success of the York Region Food Network (YRFN). Our engagement with YRFN has been more a tapestry of research engagement in areas of policy such as their Food Charter leadership as well as areas of programming such as their Aquaponics lab. Dr. Rod MacRae from the Faculty of Environmental Studies has provided oversight and engagement over this relationship and for a true grassroots organization it is great to see the significant impact YRFN is having in the Region.

The report also provides readers a two-page infographic which takes them along a timeline of development and accomplishment for the KMb Unit. Partnerships, staff hiring and service milestones are all represented in this great visual look back over time. The leadership of KMb at York is reflected well in this work developed by our Data and Communications Student, Meghan Terry.
Meghan is also the feature of our annual Student Profile.

Students play a very important role in support the work of the KMb Unit and with two students working regularly in our office (also working with Meghan is Rebecca Giblon as a Research Translation Assistant). Over the years students have been involved in many key operational developments, including this annual report. Our commitment to train and support students in areas of KMb is something we are very proud of.

Annual reports provide a good opportunity to reflect, gather data and information and help plan moving forward. And while we’re hopeful to share an Annual Report in 2025-2026 to reflect our 20th anniversary we acknowledge that year over year the growth, development and refinement of our service unit is important to capture, share and showcase. So we will focus on this 11th year of engaging our researchers and their partners outside the university in an effort to help research inform important areas of public policy and professional practice.

Lastly, 2016-2017 will see the KMb Unit formally move within the Innovation York office. This move will situate all innovation services for research in one office. We’re excited for the opportunities which we feel will strengthen our capacity to provide quality services.

Thank you for 10 years of support!

Knowledge Mobilization, Research Impact, and the Changing Nature of Academic Work / La mobilisation des connaissances, l’impact de la recherche et la nature changeante du travail universitaire

That’s the title of a research article written by Matthew McKean, Conference Board of Canada. The article reviews the ResearchImpact network and the emerging importance of knowledge mobilization in Canada’s academic research enterprise and Canada’s inclusive innovation agenda.

Voilà le titre d’un article de fond publié par Matthew McKean, du Conference Board du Canada. L’auteur examine le Réseau Impact Recherche et l’importance de plus en plus affirmée de la mobilisation des connaissances, dans la conduite de la recherche universitaire au Canada comme dans le programme d’innovation inclusif que le pays s’est donné.

Conference Board of Canada logo

According to their website the Conference Board of Canada is the foremost independent, evidence-based, not-for-profit applied research organization in Canada. They are dedicated to building a better future for Canadians by making our economy and society more dynamic and competitive. They have decided that a more dynamic and competitive Canadian economy and society needs knowledge mobilization. And knowledge mobilization needs ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche (RIR), Canada’s knowledge mobilization network.

The article (available for free download here) describes the changing nature of academic work making the case that bibliometric citations are no longer sufficient to capture the diverse impacts of academic research. This is seen most keenly in research grant applications most of which now require some form of impact statement (what impact will arise) and knowledge mobilization plan (how you’re going to get there). The article cites literature and interviews with researchers and knowledge mobilization practitioners (including myself and RIR brokers Bojan Fürst from Memorial University and Cathy Edwards from Carleton University).

The paper is summarized in four points “at a glance”:

– “Universities need to invest in institutional supports, such as dedicated knowledge brokers, for knowledge mobilization, as they currently do for technology transfer and industry liaison

– University-based researchers would benefit from faculty evaluation criteria that incentivizes high-impact, interdisciplinary social, economic, environmental, cultural, and health research

– The Pan-Canadian ResearchImpact network supports and facilitates knowledge mobilization and collaboration among faculty and student researchers, as well as community, industry, and government partners

– A network approach reduces the barriers between disciplines and enhances collaboration supporting research impacts in communities across Canada”

Importantly, the paper makes the point that knowledge mobilization activities complement traditional commercialization and industry liaison activities. This is important because universities beyond the 12 RIR campuses are not making efforts to maximize the contributions of research to Canada’s economic, social or environmental progress.

All our universities have services that help researchers connect to industry and to commercial markets but they only serve those few disciplines aligned to commercial outcomes. Many of our researchers in social sciences, humanities, creative arts and many STEM disciplines will never work with industry, file a patent or start up a company but their research might be relevant to public policy, professional practice or social services. If we rely solely on traditional methods of commercialization and industry liaison we will fail to maximize the impacts of much academic research. We will fail to contribute to what Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) Canada is calling inclusive innovation.

ISED states that “Innovation is the path to inclusive growth. It fosters a thriving middle class and opens the country to new economic, social and environmental possibilities” and that everyone has a role to play. “This collaborative approach is essential because every sector of society—from the business community to universities and colleges, the not-for-profit sector, social entrepreneurs and Indigenous business leaders—pulls some of the levers that drive innovation, growth and well-being.”

Be prepared to hear a lot more about inclusive innovation as the current review of Canada’s innovation agenda concludes and begins to report out to Canadians.

That’s what makes this report from the Conference Board of Canada timely. Academic research institutions can contribute to an inclusive innovation agenda by adopting knowledge mobilization practices as well as traditional supports for commercialization and industry liaison.

Big thanks to Matthew McKean for researching and writing the article. Thanks also to knowledge mobilization colleagues Peter Levesque (Institute for Knowledge Mobilization) and Purnima Sundar (Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health) who provided a critical review of the manuscript for Matthew.