The ResearchImpact Network – What’s in It for You? / Le Réseau Impact Recherche – qu’avez-vous à y gagner ?

A few universities are considering joining the ResearchImpact network. I was asked recently to identify what a university might get for its annual membership fee of $5,000. Essentially, what is the value proposition for membership?

Quelques universités songent à se joindre au Réseau Impact Recherche. On m’a demandé récemment ce qu’une université membre pouvait attendre de son adhésion annuelle, au cout de 5 000 $. En clair : quelle est la proposition de valeur du Réseau ?

ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche (RIR) is Canada’s knowledge mobilization network with 12 universities from St. John’s to Victoria all investing in their own knowledge mobilization and related activities and all investing $5,000 annually to fund network operations. While we do not have an active recruitment drive we are always interested in speaking to universities who wish to learn from our diverse practices and contribute to the network so we can all grow our skills. What’s in it for you?

Part of the value proposition is articulated in our Strategic Plan.

Mission
• We build Canada’s capacity to be a leader in knowledge mobilization by developing and sharing best practices, services and tools, and by demonstrating to relevant stakeholders and the public the positive impacts of mobilizing knowledge.

Vision
• We will maximize the impact of university research for the social, cultural, economic, environmental, and health benefits across local and global communities.

Values
• We believe that academic research contributes to social, cultural, economic, environmental, and health benefits across local and global communities.
• We believe that the university research enterprise encompasses research, scholarship and creative activity by faculty, students and staff across all disciplines.
• We value community, industry and government partners as active participants in conducting research.
• We believe that knowledge mobilization services reflect the capacity and opportunities of institutional members.

Essentially we are a community of practice of institutional knowledge mobilizers all with different skills using different tools with different mandates in different organizational constructs. See the figure below that summarizes this diversity

RIR Unit service models

It is this diversity that is the value proposition. You will learn from other universities to bolster your own practice and help maximize the impacts of your research. Some examples of our practices – there are more:

• Memorial Univesity: Strong focus on public engagement; use of yaffle.ca as a tool for knowledge brokering
• University of New Brunswick: Social Policy Research Network with a focus on knowledge mobilization to inform provincial policy
• Université du Québec à Montréal: Services aux Collectivitées – a community based knowledge brokering function
• Carleton Univesity: 1125 @ Carleton is a Living Lab model
• York University: Central Office of Research Services model including support for knowledge mobilization strategies in grant applications; research impact assessment
• University of Guelph: Research Shop model
• Kwantlen Polytechnic University: Service learning model
• University of Victoria: Research partnership model

Your $5,000 buys you access into these different practices so you can take from the network what fits in your context.

We believe that knowledge mobilization helps universities participate more fully in the federal government’s emerging innovation agenda which is being drafted around the core concept of inclusive innovation. We can more fully participate in inclusive innovation by connecting research in all disciplines to partners from all sectors (public, private and non-profit) to create impacts on local and global citizens. RIR is the only network in the world focused on institutional knowledge mobilization to maximize the impacts of academic research.

Membership has its privileges.

For more information about please email info@researchimpact.ca or email me directly at dphipps@yorku.ca.

Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization

Certificate in knowledge mobilization

As of January 2017, the University of Guelph’s Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization will be offered entirely online. Through three eight-week courses, the program helps participants develop new skills and use various techniques to help turn knowledge into action.

Turning Knowledge into Action
Promotional Early Bird Fee offered until November 25, 2016.
Register today at www.knowledgemobilization.ca

The program

The Certificate in Knowledge Mobilization builds capacity for the transformation of knowledge into action. Participants will learn to identify and address barriers to knowledge mobilization, transfer or exchange, and use tools and techniques to facilitate the development of evidence-informed policy and practice.

The program consists of three online courses:

1. Inform: Processes of knowledge translation and dissemination (January 23 to March 19, 2017)
2. Engage: Building capacity to understand and use relevant evidence (September 18 to November 12, 2017)
3. Act: Transforming knowledge into action (January 22 to March 18, 2018)

Who should participate?

The certificate is targeted towards KMb practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and service providers working in the social sciences, human services and health sectors. We also welcome graduate students interested in building KMb skills or planning to work in one of these fields.

Instructors

The courses will be taught by experienced instructors and knowledge brokers:
Anne Bergen, Ph.D., Director, Knowledge to Action Consulting
Travis Sztainert, Ph.D., Knowledge Broker and Content Specialist at Gambling Research Exchange Ontario

For more information, visit us at www.knowledgemobilization.ca.

KMb at York 2015-2016 Annual Report Released / L’Unité de MdC de l’Université York rapport annuel pour 2015-2016

KMb at York has completed it’s Annual Report for 2015-16. The report highlights current services and recent successes and this report shared reflections on 10 years of KMb services at York University.

L’Unité de mobilisation des connaissances de l’Université York vient de terminer son rapport annuel pour 2015-2016. Ce rapport met en lumière les services offerts actuellement et les réussites les plus récentes, et propose une réflexion sur dix années de MdC à York.

2015-2016-kmb-at-yorku-annual-report-coverYou won’t have to look far to notice a central overarching theme to our Annual Report, which is recently completed and can be accessed here. The title page reflects a new logo we shared to reflect the 10 year anniversary of KMb Unit services and support at York U and for York Region and the entire Greater Toronto Area.

This 16 page report highlights our services, activities, partnerships and accomplishments over the past year and since 2006. The feature story is the success of the York Region Food Network (YRFN). Our engagement with YRFN has been more a tapestry of research engagement in areas of policy such as their Food Charter leadership as well as areas of programming such as their Aquaponics lab. Dr. Rod MacRae from the Faculty of Environmental Studies has provided oversight and engagement over this relationship and for a true grassroots organization it is great to see the significant impact YRFN is having in the Region.

The report also provides readers a two-page infographic which takes them along a timeline of development and accomplishment for the KMb Unit. Partnerships, staff hiring and service milestones are all represented in this great visual look back over time. The leadership of KMb at York is reflected well in this work developed by our Data and Communications Student, Meghan Terry.
Meghan is also the feature of our annual Student Profile.

Students play a very important role in support the work of the KMb Unit and with two students working regularly in our office (also working with Meghan is Rebecca Giblon as a Research Translation Assistant). Over the years students have been involved in many key operational developments, including this annual report. Our commitment to train and support students in areas of KMb is something we are very proud of.

Annual reports provide a good opportunity to reflect, gather data and information and help plan moving forward. And while we’re hopeful to share an Annual Report in 2025-2026 to reflect our 20th anniversary we acknowledge that year over year the growth, development and refinement of our service unit is important to capture, share and showcase. So we will focus on this 11th year of engaging our researchers and their partners outside the university in an effort to help research inform important areas of public policy and professional practice.

Lastly, 2016-2017 will see the KMb Unit formally move within the Innovation York office. This move will situate all innovation services for research in one office. We’re excited for the opportunities which we feel will strengthen our capacity to provide quality services.

Thank you for 10 years of support!

Knowledge Mobilization, Research Impact, and the Changing Nature of Academic Work / La mobilisation des connaissances, l’impact de la recherche et la nature changeante du travail universitaire

That’s the title of a research article written by Matthew McKean, Conference Board of Canada. The article reviews the ResearchImpact network and the emerging importance of knowledge mobilization in Canada’s academic research enterprise and Canada’s inclusive innovation agenda.

Voilà le titre d’un article de fond publié par Matthew McKean, du Conference Board du Canada. L’auteur examine le Réseau Impact Recherche et l’importance de plus en plus affirmée de la mobilisation des connaissances, dans la conduite de la recherche universitaire au Canada comme dans le programme d’innovation inclusif que le pays s’est donné.

Conference Board of Canada logo

According to their website the Conference Board of Canada is the foremost independent, evidence-based, not-for-profit applied research organization in Canada. They are dedicated to building a better future for Canadians by making our economy and society more dynamic and competitive. They have decided that a more dynamic and competitive Canadian economy and society needs knowledge mobilization. And knowledge mobilization needs ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche (RIR), Canada’s knowledge mobilization network.

The article (available for free download here) describes the changing nature of academic work making the case that bibliometric citations are no longer sufficient to capture the diverse impacts of academic research. This is seen most keenly in research grant applications most of which now require some form of impact statement (what impact will arise) and knowledge mobilization plan (how you’re going to get there). The article cites literature and interviews with researchers and knowledge mobilization practitioners (including myself and RIR brokers Bojan Fürst from Memorial University and Cathy Edwards from Carleton University).

The paper is summarized in four points “at a glance”:

– “Universities need to invest in institutional supports, such as dedicated knowledge brokers, for knowledge mobilization, as they currently do for technology transfer and industry liaison

– University-based researchers would benefit from faculty evaluation criteria that incentivizes high-impact, interdisciplinary social, economic, environmental, cultural, and health research

– The Pan-Canadian ResearchImpact network supports and facilitates knowledge mobilization and collaboration among faculty and student researchers, as well as community, industry, and government partners

– A network approach reduces the barriers between disciplines and enhances collaboration supporting research impacts in communities across Canada”

Importantly, the paper makes the point that knowledge mobilization activities complement traditional commercialization and industry liaison activities. This is important because universities beyond the 12 RIR campuses are not making efforts to maximize the contributions of research to Canada’s economic, social or environmental progress.

All our universities have services that help researchers connect to industry and to commercial markets but they only serve those few disciplines aligned to commercial outcomes. Many of our researchers in social sciences, humanities, creative arts and many STEM disciplines will never work with industry, file a patent or start up a company but their research might be relevant to public policy, professional practice or social services. If we rely solely on traditional methods of commercialization and industry liaison we will fail to maximize the impacts of much academic research. We will fail to contribute to what Innovation, Science and Economic Development (ISED) Canada is calling inclusive innovation.

ISED states that “Innovation is the path to inclusive growth. It fosters a thriving middle class and opens the country to new economic, social and environmental possibilities” and that everyone has a role to play. “This collaborative approach is essential because every sector of society—from the business community to universities and colleges, the not-for-profit sector, social entrepreneurs and Indigenous business leaders—pulls some of the levers that drive innovation, growth and well-being.”

Be prepared to hear a lot more about inclusive innovation as the current review of Canada’s innovation agenda concludes and begins to report out to Canadians.

That’s what makes this report from the Conference Board of Canada timely. Academic research institutions can contribute to an inclusive innovation agenda by adopting knowledge mobilization practices as well as traditional supports for commercialization and industry liaison.

Big thanks to Matthew McKean for researching and writing the article. Thanks also to knowledge mobilization colleagues Peter Levesque (Institute for Knowledge Mobilization) and Purnima Sundar (Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health) who provided a critical review of the manuscript for Matthew.

Human centred innovation / L’innovation centrée sur l’humain

The Canadian Federation of Humanities and Social Sciences (“The Federation”) made a submission to Canada’s Innovation Agenda. The Federation argues that “we need to bring creativity and imagination to bear on complex problems and understand the human process at the heart of innovation”. This includes strengthening connections and knowledge flow among humanities and social sciences (HSS) researchers and other partners from governments, civil society, academia and business.

La Fédération canadienne des sciences humaines (« la Fédération ») a suggéré des orientations au Programme d’innovation du Canada. La Fédération soutient que « nous devons rivaliser de créativité et d’imagination pour dénouer des problèmes complexes et comprendre le processus humain au cœur de l’innovation ». Cela suppose notamment le renforcement des liens et des échanges de connaissances entre les chercheurs des sciences humaines et leurs partenaires du gouvernement, de la société civile et du milieu des affaires.

Federation logoLed by Minister Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development), Canada is developing a new innovation strategy and is soliciting input from individuals and organizations across Canada. The Federation, drawing on their representation of over 160 universities, colleges and scholarly associations and a community of over 91,000 researchers and students, made a submission that promoted the human element of innovation.

The Federation’s submission contains three areas of focus including:
• expand experiential learning for all students through an expansion of the Post-Secondary Industry Partnership and Cooperative Placement Initiative to include HSS.
• increase fundamental research into human thought, behaviour and experiences. This will increase HSS research funding to be a minimum of 20 percent (=approximately double current levels) of Canada’s federal research portfolio within 10 years.
• strengthen connections and knowledge flow among HSS researchers and other partners from governments, civil society, academia and business to help Canada find innovative solutions to pressing complex social challenges.

This last area deals with knowledge mobilization. This third section of the submission cites examples from SFU, OCAD U, Ryerson and Concordia to illustrate mechanisms to connect HSS research(ers) to society. While individual examples of knowledge mobilization abound, mainly in individual research programs and research centres, there are fewer examples of institutional supports such as those practiced by the 12 universities in ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche (RIR), Canada’s knowledge mobilization network. The submission calls for “a supportive national framework for such collaborations to enable scaling up of local innovations”. It then proceeds with recommendation #3 which includes the following:

Significant federal funding should be devoted to the creation and expansion of university-based innovation and cross-disciplinary hubs to address the broad range of social and economic complex challenges facing Canadians. For example, the government should enhance support for multi-disciplinary knowledge-mobilization networks, such as the ResearchImpact Network (www.researchimpact.ca), to scale up existing services that connect the public, private, not-for-profit and higher education sectors

Minister Bains will hopefully take note when presented with these recommendations. Canada needs a pan-Canadian knowledge mobilization strategy that will build on the lessons learned by the 12 RIR members and strengthen knowledge flows in communities and campuses across Canada.

Collectively these three recommendations from The Federation create the call to action for a human centred innovation strategy. Tony Surman (CEO, Centre for Social Innovation) has written in the Globe & Mail that Canada’s ‘innovation agenda’ isn’t dependent on just tech – it is also dependent on social factors and social innovation. This is critical to answering the call of Daniele Zanotti, CEO of United Way Toronto & York Region, who says we will not charity our way out of complex social issues. We need new combinations of knowledge and expertise that employ a human centred model of innovation.

Thanks you to The Federation for promoting the critical role of HSS in Canada’s innovation system. As part of this innovation Canada needs a pan Canadian knowledge mobilization strategy. Canada needs ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche.

SSHRC Strategic Plan Sets the Stage for Knowledge Mobilization / Le Plan stratégique du CRSH met la table pour la mobilisation des connaissances

Congratulations SSHRC on a new strategic plan. Implementing this plan will help social sciences and humanities research have an impact on the lives of Canadians.

Toutes nos félicitations pour ce nouveau plan stratégique ! Grâce à lui, la recherche en sciences humaines et sociales aura encore plus d’impact sur la vie des Canadiens et des Canadiennes.

SSHRC strategic plan image

SSHRC recently released its new strategic plan to guide its investments and impact from 2016-2020. The plan is organized around the three pillars of SSHRC’s funding: research (=insight); training (=talent) and knowledge mobilization (=connections). All three underpin SSHRC’s traditional impacts on scholarship and training; however, the strategic plan also provides direction on how the social sciences and humanities can have an impact on Canadians outside of the academy. For more information on the potential impacts of the social sciences and humanities please see the Federation of the Humanities and Social Sciences who launched a project in late 2014 to explore how to measure these impacts.

SSHRC’s desire to create impacts is evident right from the opening page:

It [social sciences and humanities research] enhances our ability to understand and creatively respond to complex individual, social, cultural and economic issues.

Right to the very last sentence:

SSHRC will advance opportunities for the results of its funding – new ideas and trained people – to be more accessible to Canadian organizations in all sectors, to contribute to decision-making and innovation, and to address the challenges of today and tomorrow.

Ted Hewitt, in his introduction to the Strategic Plan, points out that, “Findings from [social sciences and humanities] research are used by – and often, developed with – stakeholders across all sectors, to improve our quality of life, enrich cultural expression, and drive prosperity, equity and sustainability through innovation.”

What SSHRC is committing to is not new for researchers. Canadian researchers, students and their research institutions have a long tradition of working in collaboration with partners from all sectors to create new knowledge, train the next generation and mobilize knowledge into social, economic and environmental impacts. For more than ten years The Harris Centre (Memorial University) and York University’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit have been leading local knowledge mobilization efforts that connect researchers and students to non-academic partners. The Community Engaged Scholarship Institute (U. Guelph) has been supporting the Research Shop and community based research since 2009. These three are among twelve universities working together as ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche (RIR). Our knowledge mobilization network has a vision to “maximize the impact of university research for the social, cultural, economic, environmental, and health benefits across local and global communities.”  RIR will accomplish this by “developing and sharing best practices, services and tools, and by demonstrating to relevant stakeholders and the public the positive impacts of mobilizing knowledge” (RIR Strategic Plan, 2014).

The commitments in SSHRC’s Strategic Plan and those of the RIR Strategic Plan are mutually reinforcing. Both will support the work of researchers and their partners seeking to make an impact on Canadians. SSHRC makes a commitment to “advance opportunities for the results of its funding–new ideas and trained people—to be more accessible to Canadian organizations in all sectors, to contribute to decision-making and innovation, and to help identify and address the challenges of today and tomorrow. In pursuit of this objective SSHRC will:

  • Collaborate with the public, private, not-for-profit and academic sectors to address key current and future challenge areas for Canada;
  • Increase opportunities for students to engage with non-academic sectors in internships and other innovative research-based learning initiatives;
  • Work with students, researchers, research institutions and other stakeholders to better articulate the value and contribution of research.”

This also describes the work of RIR. RIR supports knowledge mobilization that facilitates research collaborations to enable research impacts. RIR promotes engaged undergraduate and graduate student experiences through community service learning, student internships and research shops. RIR is developing methods to assess and communicate the impacts of research on Canadians. RIR has adapted the impact case study format of the UK Research Excellence Framework and complemented it with methods of contribution analysis.

The work at SSHRC to achieve this commitment is well underway. SSHRC’s Imagining Canada’s Future initiative as an example of how SSHRC is already connecting research and researchers beyond the academy to help address and prepare for our future. In 2014 the (then) four Ontario RIR universities – Carleton, York, Guelph and Wilfrid Laurier – collaborated on four regional, SSHRC funded events that collectively helped to imagine Canada’s future by addressing the question: “What knowledge do we need to thrive in an interconnected landscape and how can emerging technology help leverage that goal and its benefits?” Details on the Carleton and Guelph events are available on line. The York event featured SSHRC Partnership Grant funded researcher, Anna Hudson, and her partners from northern Inuit communities and Inuit media companies who also recently presented to the Canadian Knowledge Transfer and Exchange Community of Practice. This recent event created further connections to Canada’s knowledge mobilization researchers and practitioners.

RIR is pleased that SSHRC is not only continuing to promote traditional impacts on scholarship and training but is supplementing these efforts by promoting the broader impacts of research on Canadians. The social sciences and humanities can raise awareness and understanding of economic, cultural, social and environmental issues. They can inform public policies, social services and professional practices that are the basis of Canadians’ responses to these complex issues. Echoing SSHRC’s last commitment above, the RIR universities also look forward to working with students, researchers and other stakeholders to support, assess and articulate the impacts of social sciences and humanities research.

Congratulations SSHRC. The RIR universities look forward to collaborating on impact.

Started in 2006, the RIR universities now include Memorial University of Newfoundland, University of New Brunswick, Université du Québec à Montréal, Université du Montréal, Carleton University, York University, McMaster University, University of Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier University, University of Saskatchewan, Kwantlen Polytechnic University and University of Victoria.

CommunityBUILD Launches the Social Venture Pipeline Accelerator Program for Social Entrepreneurs

This post originally appeared in YFile on April 6, 2014 and is reposted here with permission.

Innovation York announces that communityBUILD, an ongoing collaboration between York University, Seneca College, ventureLAB, United Way Toronto and York Region, has launched a new Social Venture Pipeline initiative to help budding social entrepreneurs in York Region build their social venture ideas into companies.

communityBUILD’s mission is to strengthen the entrepreneurial ecosystem by addressing important social issues in York Region and beyond. The new Social Venture Pipeline initiative is now accepting applications to join the program beginning in May 2016.  The program consists of a four and one half month accelerator followed by a three month incubator for social ventures near to launching their solutions to market.

Robert Hache

Robert Hache

“communityBUILD finds ways to engage social entrepreneurs who are focused on addressing major social issues, whether on a local or global scale,” said Robert Haché, York’s vice-president research & innovation. “Entrepreneurs who are accepted into the Social Venture Pipeline program will benefit from research expertise and mentorship, as well as opportunities to learn more about social issues important to York Region.”

The Social Venture Pipeline initiative is a program that arose from York’s partnerships with United Way Toronto, York Region and ventureLAB, the York Region’s Regional Innovation Centre and Seneca College. communityBUILD’s unique collaboration connects the strengths of university and college research with entrepreneurship and the lived experiences of members of the York Region community.

David Phipps

David Phipps

“For more than 10 years, York University and the United Way have been working together to help to advance social innovation.  Our collaborative expertise in this area helps distinguish the Social Venture Pipeline initiative from other supports for social enterprises in Ontario,” said David Phipps, executive director of research & innovation services at York University.

The goal is for entrepreneurs to merge the social impacts with business acumen to turn their social venture ideas into growing and emerging businesses. The Social Venture Pipeline program builds on the programming offered through the communityBUILD Social Innovation Mash-Up competition in 2014.

Innovation York helps bring innovative research and discoveries to market by connecting industry partners and other entrepreneurs with researchers and students. The organization provides access to resources and information, and creating a vibrant and engaged research community for start-ups to be successful and enabling social innovation.

Applications for the Social Venture Pipeline are due on April 15. For more information or to register, visit: http://www.venturelab.ca/communityBUILD.

CommunityBUILD: Social Venture Pipeline

This week’s guest post comes from ventureLAB

Applications are now open for the Social Venture Pipeline!

WHAT IS THE MISSION OF THE SOCIAL VENTURE PIPELINE?

To improve the success of social ventures in getting to launch and accessing funding and investment.

WHAT IS THE SOCIAL VENTURE PIPELINE?

VentureLab logo horz 4CThe Social Venture Pipeline is program of the communityBUILD initiative. It is a curated pathway for those ventures approaching launch into market and revenue generation consisting of a 4.5-month Accelerator program followed by a 3-month Incubator. Participants will be supported to move their businesses forward to launch through education, networking and mentoring provided by communityBUILD’s expert mentors.

Read more and apply now!

Canadian Science Policy Fellowship / Bourse pour l’élaboration de politiques canadiennes

The call for applications opens February 17, 2016, and closes March 31, 2016 at 5 p.m. PDT.  Fellowships begin in September 2016 and last for 12 months.

L’appel de candidatures débute le 17 février 2016, et prend fin le 31 mars 2016 à 17 h (HAP).  Les stages, d’une durée de 12 mois, commenceront en septembre 2016.

MitacsAbout the fellowship

Mitacs is committed to fostering policy leadership among Canada’s researchers. We have worked closely with the academic research and policy communities to identify ways to integrate academic research and evidence-based policy-making at the federal level. Mitacs and its partners are pleased to introduce the result of this collaboration, the Canadian Science Policy Fellowship.  

The fellowship helps government develop policy with advice from respected professors and postdoctoral scholars and will strengthen ties between the public sector and academia. The first of its kind in Canada, the fellowship is offered in partnership with the University of Ottawa’s Institute for Science, Society and Policy (ISSP), Mitacs’ university partners, and the Government of Canada.

The inaugural cohort of 10–12 fellows will be matched with federal host departments or agencies in Ottawa, where they will contribute to policy design, implementation, and/or evaluation.  Matches will align each fellow’s background and expertise with the identified needs of the host department.

The fellowship aims to:

  • Form mutually beneficial and robust relationships between government decision-makers and academic researchers in support of pressing policy challenges in Canada
  • Enhance science communication, collaboration, and policy capacity within government departments and agencies
  • Develop a network of external expertise in Canadian science policy that complements existing capacity within the public service

Click here for more information.

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MitacsAu sujet de la bourse

Mitacs s’est engagé à favoriser un leadership en matière de politiques parmi les chercheurs canadiens. Nous avons travaillé en étroite collaboration avec les milieux des politiques et de la recherche universitaire pour trouver des façons d’intégrer au niveau fédéral l’élaboration de politiques reposant sur des données probantes et la recherche universitaire. Mitacs et ses partenaires ont le plaisir de lancer le fruit de cette collaboration, la Bourse pour l’élaboration de politiques canadiennes.

Cette bourse a pour but d’aider le gouvernement à élaborer des politiques en tirant profit des conseils de chercheurs postdoctoraux et de professeurs respectés, et renforcera les liens entre le secteur public et le milieu universitaire. Première initiative du genre au Canada, cette bourse est offerte en partenariat avec l’Institut de recherche sur la science, la société et la politique publique (ISSP) de l’Université d’Ottawa, des universités partenaires de Mitacs et le gouvernement du Canada.

Les 10 à 12 participants de la cohorte inaugurale seront jumelés à des organismes ou des ministères d’accueil du gouvernement fédéral à Ottawa où ils participeront à l’élaboration, à la mise en œuvre et/ou à l’évaluation de politiques.   Chaque participant sera jumelé en fonction de son expertise et de ses antécédents, ainsi que des besoins soulevés par le ministère d’accueil.

Le programme de bourses vise les objectifs suivants :

  • établir des relations solides et mutuellement avantageuses entre les décideurs du gouvernement et les chercheurs universitaires à l’appui des défis urgents que doit relever le Canada en lien avec les politiques;
  • améliorer la capacité des ministères et organismes du gouvernement en matière de communications, de collaboration et d’élaboration de politiques;
  • mettre sur pied un réseau d’experts externes en sciences politiques canadiennes pour renforcer la capacité actuelle de la fonction publique.

Cliquez ici pour voir plus d’informations.

York University’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit Celebrates 10 Years of Service

This week’s post, celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Knowledge Mobilization Unit at York University, first appeared in YFile on February 7, 2016 and is reposted here with permission.

KMb at York 10 year logoYork University’s Knowledge  Mobilization (KMb) Unit, a national leader with an international reputation for connecting research and researchers to maximize the impact of their findings on society, is celebrating 10 years of service.

Since it was founded in February 2006, the KMb Unit has created significant impacts by helping to secure more than $42.9 million in federal research funding and $1.14 million in funding from community partners. It has engaged 323 faculty members and 167 graduate students from across the University in KMb activities, it has hosted 636 information sessions and created 422 brokering opportunities.

“Throughout the years, York’s award-winning Knowledge Mobilization Unit has helped to strengthen the relationship between research, policy and practice on a global scale,” said Robert Haché, York’s vice-president research & innovation.

The KMb Unit has been sought out to provide input into organizations in the United States, the United Kingdom (UK), Australia, New Zealand, Columbia and Argentina.  “We are delighted to be celebrating 10 years of service and look forward to advancing social innovation through engaged scholarship,” said Haché.

The work of the KMb Unit assisted the Youth Emergency Shelter of Peterborough in creating a new life skills mentoring program. It has helped York research inform the cooling policies for the City of Toronto during extreme heat alerts. It has also helped develop the Toronto Weather Wise Committee and the United Way York Region create a new funding stream called Strength Investments that are helping to build civic muscle in York Region. Based on a connection made by the KMb Unit, York research helped the Regional Municipality of York expand their immigrant settlement services by investing over $20 million, creating 86 jobs and delivering more than 48,000 services over a five-year period.

York’s KMb Unit has enjoyed other successes. In 2012, York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit received the Knowledge Economy Network Best Practice Award from the European-based Knowledge Economy Network (KEN). A year later, David Phipps, executive director, research and  innovation services, which includes York University’s KMb Unit, was named the most influential knowledge broker in Canada, according to a report by Knowledge Mobilization Works, a consulting and training company based in Ottawa. Currently, the KMb Unit is collaborating with colleagues from the UK on a project that will develop capacity for university-based knowledge mobilization professionals.

York University is also a founding member of ResearchImpact (RIR), a pan-Canadian network of 12 universities committed to maximizing the impact of academic research for the social, economic, environmental and health benefits of Canadians. RIR is committed to developing institutional capacities to support knowledge mobilization by developing and sharing knowledge mobilization best practices, services and tools.

Since 2012, the KMb Unit has partnered with NeuroDevNet, a Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence (NCE), which is dedicated to understanding brain development and to helping children and their families overcome the challenges of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism, fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy, to maximize the social and economic impacts of NeuroDevNet’s investments in research and training.

Founded in February 2006, the unit provides a suite of activities that enhances the two-way connection between researchers and research users. The KMb Unit employs knowledge brokers who connect research and people to maximize the social, economic and environmental impacts of research. It is dedicated to knowledge brokering and partnership support, training and capacity building, and supporting research grants and research event planning.

For more information, contact Michael Johnny, manager, knowledge mobilization, or visit www.researchimpact.ca or follow @researchimpact on Twitter.

The Who, What and How of Research Impact / L’impact de la recherche : le qui, le quoi et le comment

David Phipps has just returned from three weeks in the UK for his Fellowship funded by the Association of Commonwealth Universities. Working with his Fellowship partner, Julie Bayley (Coventry University), he became immersed in research impacts mediated through public engagement, commercialization, entrepreneurship, internationalization and knowledge exchange. This affords the opportunity for a trans-Atlantic comparison of the people who are creating and assessing the many impacts of research. You can help by participating in a survey to help us figure this out.

David Phipps rentre tout juste d’un voyage de trois semaines au Royaume-Uni, où il a avancé les travaux qu’il réalise à titre de boursier de l’Association of Commonwealth Universities. Avec sa partenaire de subvention, Julie Bayley (de la Coventry University), il s’est penché sur l’impact produit par l’engagement dans le domaine public, la commercialisation, l’entrepreneuriat, l’internationalisation et l’échange de connaissances.Cela ouvre la porte à une comparaison transatlantique des personnes qui créent et qui évaluent les multiples impacts de la recherche.Vous pouvez les aider à mettre de l’ordre dans tout cela en participant à un sondage.

Julie Bayley and David Phipps

Julie Bayley and David Phipps

If research impact were a coin it would have two sides: heads (research impact assessment) and tails (knowledge mobilization that creates impacts of research). My Canadian experience is almost wholly knowledge mobilization – the practices and tools that help to maximize the economic, social and environmental impacts of research. Driven by the REF (see below), Julie’s UK experience is almost wholly capturing the evidence of impact and connecting the steps in the narrative that describes the pathway(s) from research to impact beyond the academy.

But despite our different perspectives on impact we have a lot of common language that allows us to navigate to our collaboration which explores the skills and competencies of knowledge brokers. These similarities among differences is reminiscent of a previous post where I attended the International School of Research Impact Assessment.

The primary difference between the two approaches to research impact is the UK’s Research Excellence Framework (REF). The REF allocated funding to universities based, in part, on their ability to articulate the impacts of their research beyond the academy. The evidence of impact, predicated on as established body of codified scholarship, was presented in a narrative case study that was then assessed by panels of academic and non-academic expertise. REF was a research impact assessment exercise affecting the entire post-secondary system in the UK. Administering the REF cost the UK £250 million although some estimates are up to four times that amount.

But here’s the thing….REF assessed impacts arising from pre-existing research. Outside of supports for commercialization and entrepreneurship there are few institutional and no system wide support networks for non-commercial impacts in the UK. This is in contrast to the Canadian experience where there is no system wide assessment of impacts beyond the academy but there are institutional efforts to help researchers and their partners create impacts exemplified by the 12 university members of ResearchImpact-RéseauImpactRecherche, Canada’s knowledge mobilization network.

Canada has developed the tools and processes to create impact (the “how” of impact). The UK has developed methods to assess and articulate impacts (the “what” of impact). My work with Julie began with these differences and progressed to focus on the “who” of impact: the public engagement officers, knowledge brokers and REF staff. We know how to support impact. We know how to assess impact. We know less about the people actually working across the spectrum from stakeholder engagement to partnership development to impact assessment.

You can help us out. If you are a working in a role that supports research impact, no matter how tangentially, then we welcome your participation in our survey. In about 20 minutes you can let us know your experiences practicing different skills and competencies in your job. You can take the survey at http://goo.gl/r3INlw. It will be live until January 31, 2016.

Recapping the Top Five Most Popular Posts of 2015 / Résumé des 5 billets les plus populaire de 2015

For this year’s annual recap of our most popular blog posts, we looked to our twitter feed @ResearchImpact. Here’s the list of the top 5 most popular blog posts according to our twitter followers:

#1 with 3478 Impressions, 85 Engagements, 9 Retweets and 10 Likes

Five Steps to Research Impact / Cinq étapes pour que la recherche ait un impact

Knowledge brokering, the formation and support of community campus collaborations, is a key knowledge mobilization method that helps to maximize the social and economic impacts of research. A recent article from York’s Knowledge Mobilization Unit breaks that method down into five steps.

Le courtage de connaissances, c’est-à-dire la formation et le renforcement de collaborations entre le campus et la collectivité, est une méthode de mobilisation des connaissances essentielle qui aide à maximiser l’impact social et économique de la recherche. Dans un article récent, l’Unité de mobilisation des connaissances de l’Université York décrit les cinq étapes de cette méthode.

#2 with 1260 Impressions, 18 Engagements, 4 Retweets and 6 Likes

Merry Mobilizing!

The annual holiday greeting from the KMb Unit at York. Thanks to Anneliese Poetz, Manager of the NeuroDevNet KT Core, for her mad Photoshop skills!

Merry Mobilizing 2015

#3 with 523 Impressions, 17 Engagements, 2 Retweets and 2 Likes

Impact is Measured by Talking to Partners Not Researchers / L’impact se mesure en parlant aux partenaires plutôt qu’aux chercheurs

Researchers either don’t know or overestimate the impact of their research beyond the academy. Here are some ways to foster closer connections between researchers and policy makers and identify stories where research had an impact beyond the academy.

Soit les chercheurs ne connaissent pas l’impact de leurs travaux à l’extérieur de l’université, soit ils le surestiment. Voici quelques clés pour favoriser les liens entre chercheurs et responsables des politiques, et pour reconnaitre les cas où la recherche a bel et bien eu un effet sur le monde extérieur.

CRFR#4 with 524 Impressions, 16 Engagements, 1 Retweet and 2 Likes

Partnerships for Impact: Making Research Partnerships Work

This guest post came from CRFR (Centre for Research on Families and Relationships) located in Edinburgh, Scotland. The Centre for Research on Families and Relationships in consultation with ResearchImpact in Canada and the National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE) have developed a Manifesto for Partnerships between Universities and Non-academics. In this post, Executive Director Sarah Morton explains what’s in the manifesto and how it can be used.

#twitter bird5 with 616 Impressions, 15 Engagements, 1 Retweet and 1 Likes

The Advantages of Live Tweeting a Research Talk

This guest post came from Dr. Allison McDonald, an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Science at Wilfrid Laurier University. This post outlines some of the opportunities Dr. McDonald experienced while live tweeting a research talk.

Merry Mobilizing!

 

Merry Mobilizing 2015

Merry Mobilizing from the Knowledge Mobilization Unit at York University!

From left to right:

Michael Johnny, Manager, Knowledge Mobilization

Anneliese Poetz, Manager, NeuroDevNet KT Core

David Phipps, Executive Director, Research & Innovation Services

Krista Jensen, Knowledge Mobilization Officer

Rebecca Giblon, Research Translation Assistant

Amber Vance, Research Translation Assistant

Meghan Terry, Design Communications Assistant

Stacie Ross, KT Assistant, NeuroDevNet KT Core

Call for Content: Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum #CKF16

Institute for Knowledge Mobilization logoOn behalf of the Board of the Institute for Knowledge Mobilization and the Chair and Planning Committee of the 2016 Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum #CKF16,  it is our pleasure to announce the Call for Content for #CKF16

The theme for this year is: Systems and Sustainability – Creating enduring Knowledge Mobilization

The deadline for contribution is March 31, 2016. 

Download Call for Content: FinalDraft_CKF16 Call for Content

Download this form to contribute content: CKF16 Call for Content Form

________________________________

The Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum was created in 2012 as a professional development forum for practitioners, researchers, students and professionals working in knowledge mobilization across fields and sectors.

It has become recognized as a premiere learning and networking event in Canada – friendly, open, limited in size, and creative. Events have been held in Ottawa (2012), Mississauga (2013), Saskatoon (2014), and Montréal (2015) and is scheduled for June 28-29 in Toronto (2016)

The theme for 2016 is: Systems and Sustainability – Creating enduring Knowledge Mobilization

This theme will challenge us all to consider our interests in knowledge mobilization in the context of the world around us. Being the fifth annual Forum, we invite participation that will push thinking and engagement of the knowledge mobilization community further. The Forum will be hosted by York University at The Hospital for Sick Children’s Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning. This world class venue will facilitate active participation, networking, reflection and learning. Further, the planning committee is offering some additional alternative sessions, some of which will be held in other downtown locations to provide unique experiences for participants.

We are driven by an objective of allowing you to design your own conference experience that reflects your interests, experience, priorities and learning styles. Drawing on the assets of the Greater Toronto Area, leaders in knowledge mobilization from all across Canada and beyond, it is our hope you will come away from #CKF16 enriched, energized and engaged in this field like never before.

Our objectives are:

Build on the past successes of the Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum, making this a preeminent event to learn and engage about knowledge mobilization in Canada
Build individual and organization capacity for knowledge mobilization
Learn about work in other sectors to enable innovation, partnerships and collaboration
Engage with leaders to influence future directions
Meet the next generation of leaders and create opportunities to mentor and coach
Access the latest tools, techniques and opportunities.

The 2016 Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum is seeking contributions for content, which addresses the overall theme of Systems and Sustainability, and links to the subthemes of:

Subtheme 1 Structures – What (for example: KMb across sectors; funding KMb; role of brokers)
Subtheme 2 Processes – How (for example: KMb tool boxes; networks; communities of practice)
Subtheme 3 Technology – Technology and Tools (for example: KMb and social media; yaffle; web 3.0)

We are also introducing a something new, The Knowmo Scale. Here, we’re inviting presenters to consider their audience. Consider this our own unique variation of the Scoville Unit scale.

Is your presentation targeting early KMb professionals? If so, you would check off Knowmo 1.

Will you focus on more experienced practitioners in KMb? If so, you would check off Knowmo 2.

Does your presentation seek to engage KMb leaders in the field? If so, please check off Knowmo 3.
Knowmo 1 Early KMb Professionals / Students
Knowmo 2 KMb Practitioners / Researchers
Knowmo 3 KMb Ninjas! (leaders in the field; a more advanced conversation on KMb issues)

We are seeking the following:

1) Catalyst Presentations of 7 minutes each.

For each session, a small group of presenters will each engage the audience with a focused 7-minute presentation.  Feel free to be provocative or pose questions.  This will be followed by a 45-minute group discussion of the ideas presented, the connections that emerge, and implications for knowledge mobilization practice.  People can apply individually or identify other presentation proposals they would like to be considered grouped with.

The value of these sessions emerges from the EXCHANGE of all participants.  The presenters create a catalyst to conversation.  Each session will be moderated by a session Chair.

2) Poster Presentations

Recommended max poster size is 36”/92cm high by 60”/152 cm wide.  The posters will be juried by an expert panel of knowledge mobilization practitioners.  Posters will be profiled at a specific event and you will have two minutes to share ‘what you need to know’ about your poster with all participants.

There are 20 openings for poster presentations.

3) Professional Development Workshops or Information Presentations of 40 minutes each

Workshops are an opportunity to share methods and tools useful to the practice of knowledge mobilization professionals in an interactive and engaging format.  The aim is to help participants to improve their skills and understanding of KMb and to become better mobilizers.

Alternatively, people are welcome to submit presentations which are less interactive and more informative.

For both, participants are welcome to consider non-traditional approaches for this exchange process: Fireside Chat; Debate; Panel Presentations or others.

4) Film and Fine Arts Dissemination of Collaborative Research – Approx. 15-30 minutes

Collaborative teams are invited to share examples of knowledge products within Fine Arts (movies, documentary, music, dance, visual art, poetry etc.) for an evening performance (think TIFF, but for KMb).   3 teams will have 30 minutes to both preview and speak to their knowledge products, sharing what they did, why they chose that and the desired impact using that medium.

There are 3 openings for Fine Arts Dissemination of Collaborative Research.

All contributions will be reviewed by an independent selection committee and judged for quality of content, the opportunity to advance our understanding of knowledge mobilization, and relevance to the theme of the 2016 Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum.

The deadline for contribution is March 31, 2016. 

Please fill the Call for Content Form and send to: peter@knowledgemobilization.net

Note: Selected content must be presented by a registered participant at the 2016 Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum in Toronto, Ontario, June 28-29, 2016.

Further details will be posted on the Institute for Knowledge Mobilization’s website: www.knowledgemobilization.net

Competencies and Skills for Knowledge Mobilization and Knowledge Exchange (Survey Request)

The following is a request for participation from David Phipps, RIR-York in his collaborative research project on priority competencies and skills for KMb and KE.

https://goo.gl/r3INlw

Two speech bubblesI am conducting a collaborative research project on priority competencies and skills for knowledge mobilization and knowledge exchange. My collaborators are Monica Batac (graduate student, Ryerson University), Julie Bayley (Coventry University) and Ed Stevens (University of Bath). Ryerson University’s Research Ethics Board has approved this study (PI: Monica Batac, supervised by Dr. Charles Davis).

I am looking for a diverse group of participants to complete the online survey on the practice of knowledge mobilization/exchange. Potential participants include knowledge mobilization researchers, knowledge brokers, intermediaries, and knowledge transfer/translation practitioners.

What you will be asked to do:

This study asks you to read and rate knowledge broker competencies based on how often you practice that skill. You will be asked to rate each of 80 competencies according to the following scale:

Crucial (practiced almost every day)
High alignment (practiced almost every week)
Medium alignment (practice monthly)
Low alignment (rarely practice)
Unrelated to my post (never practice)

The survey should take you about 30 minutes to complete.

The survey can be found at:

https://goo.gl/r3INlw

Your choice of whether or not to participate will not influence your future relationships
with me or any of the project collaborators and our affilitated universities.

Please feel free to forward this recruitment message to those who may like to
participate.