8 Responses to “Tech Transfer Growing Pains?”

written by Markus Latzel On 11 November 2009 Reply


great summary of the activities on the conference, glad to get a snapshot without being able to participate myself!

On Technology Transfer, I say that it is far from dead – it’s just slowed down to snails-pace by shackling a few weights to it’s legs. Palomino has been involved with a number of tech transfer projects with various academic institutions, and I am always dazzled by how in-homogeneous the process is across Canada. The biggest concern in all cases are the details within IP agreements. These complications can be aggravated by conflict-of-interests, joint-ownerships, and collective faculty agreements – quite amazing actually.

The bottom line is, every entrepreneur in Canada would need a commercial law degree on IP rights before venturing into the academic world, since practical help will not come from university legal departments. However, as mentioned, the will is there with all parties involved, so in the end transfer does happen, if much slower than south of the border. I am looking forward to a common guideline for this process, to help us what we love to do – tech transfer!

– Markus

written by David Phipps On 11 November 2009 Reply

Thanks for reading and commenting. I think TT has a lot to learn from Knowledge Mobilization which is why I am here. We will not charge for KM. We feel the public has already invested in the generation of the research through tax $ s they shouldn’t have to pay for it twice. We want to get results into the hands of decision makers. We don’t charge for it. TT has such a paradigm of money making mostly coming through some very lucrative deals in the early years. Money still can be made but it has got to be made in partnership not in a one way push of technology. TT will change but only very slowly.

written by Heather Bullock On 16 November 2009 Reply

Hi David:

Loved your blogs from the tech transfer meeting. To be honest, I probably wouldn’t have read through your blogs if they were text alone since TT is only peripherally related to my work but now I can say I learned a few new things and have some more insight into that world all while eating Vietnamese take out for lunch. The length worked for me too…more please!


written by David Phipps On 18 November 2009 Reply

Thanks for commenting Heather. I enjoyed the video blog experience but will need a few more to be comfortable with it. It does add a different dimension. Need better lighting…maybe make up…maybe a beer would help!

written by Réjean Hall On 25 November 2009 Reply

Bonjour David,

Super job videoblogging from ACCT AGM – I could not make it this time..so your feedback is excellent.

Your posts and references are very useful to us at l’U. de Moncton as we are reviewing our TT/KT goals and defining an action plan.



written by David Phipps On 26 November 2009 Reply

Rejean, We missed you at ACCT but I am glad my video blog kept you up to date. Thanks also for copying me on your e mail about our work. Fingers crossed for the public outreach grant that will bring us all together to discuss these issues in more depth. All the best, David.

[…] travel to technology transfer conferences (check out our video blogs from November 10 and November 11). Then I had Christmas… I’m not complaining but I have been a wee bit […]

[…] their business decisions and business processes. As mentioned in the ResearchImpact video blog on November 11, 2009, KM can foster relationships between business and the university in disciplines that are relevant […]

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