Speech From the Throne calls for more knowledge mobilization for Canada

“The Speech from the Throne opens every new session of Parliament. The Speech introduces the government’s direction and goals, and outlines how it will work to achieve them. On November 23, 2021, Her Excellency the Right Honourable Mary Simon, Governor General of Canada, delivered the Speech from the Throne to open the first session of the 44th Parliament […]

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The impact of history research is knowable for those who wish to know it

Gary Myers and David Phipps (both from York University) wrote a response to an article that posited that the impact of history research is ultimately unknowable. A summary of their response and link to their article is below. In winter 2021 Penny Bryden, President (at the time) of the Canadian Historical Association wrote in the […]

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Innovation and Knowledge Mobilization

A colleague at a Research Impact Canada member university recently asked me (David Phipps) about innovation, knowledge mobilization and indicators to know the difference. This is the e-mail exchange. Sharon: How do you know when innovation is happening in a knowledge mobilization process? What are the indicators? David: Do you mean an innovative KMb process […]

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University of Ottawa’s growth as a knowledge mobilization university

Since 2018, the University of Ottawa’s Research Connexions Unit has demonstrated excellent growth as a knowledge mobilization university. In collaboration with Terry Campbell, Marie-Eve Girard, and Aislinn Gallivan, Research Impact Canada has co-designed an infographic to illustrate the amazing knowledge mobilization work of the Research Connexions Unit! […]

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CKF20 Event Report: The future of knowledge mobilization events is virtual

This past year, we witnessed rapid innovation in online events. Having seen the benefits, we predict organizers will continue to include virtual components to compliment in-person events and conferences. The Canadian Knowledge Mobilization Forum is a bi-annual event that brings together researchers, students, practitioners, and professionals who work in the field of knowledge mobilization. In […]

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Taking Knowledge Mobilization (KMb) into History

This guest blog was written by J. Gary Myers who has a background in knowledge mobilization as an award-winning community-based knowledge broker and writer who has co-authored a book chapter, peer-reviewed articles, and wrote weekly articles over five years on the website, KMbeing. Gary also has a long-standing interest in Canadian cultural and LGBTQ2S+ history and decided […]

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Imagining the Future(s) of Knowledge Mobilization

From the SSHRC website: “SSHRC has partnered with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO and its Network of UNESCO Chairs, as well as Research Impact Canada, to examine promising practices in knowledge mobilization, inclusive knowledge dissemination, and knowledge engagement. Thought leadership papers address how knowledge mobilization can help us confront formidable future challenges (PDF, 12.4 MB) […]

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How did knowledge mobilization become a “thing” in Canada?

David was recently asked by a colleague about the history and driving forces behind growth of knowledge mobilization in Canada’s research landscape. Did you know the journey is as old as Canada itself?   A few weeks ago, a colleague e mailed me asking, “Do you know approximately when the funding agencies started to mandate […]

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Power and Privilege in Peer Review

David Phipps was recently asked to speak to a research funder and some community reviewers about community engagement and inclusion in peer review of global health research grants. Issues of power and privilege come to play when combining community/public/patient reviewers with academic reviewers. It’s a nice idea but it isn’t effective in common practice. He […]

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