Approaches to assessing impacts in the humanities and social sciences: Recommendations from the Canadian research community

This week’s guest post was first published on the LSE Impact Blog on January 10, 2018 and is reposted here with permission. Conversations about the assessment of scholarly impacts are frequently hindered by uncertainty, anxiety, or suspicion. Peter Severinson reports on work published by the Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences in Canada that […]

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Free Access to Building the Concept of Research Impact Literacy Article

We are pleased to announce that this article written by Julie Bayley and David Phipps and published in Evidence & Policy, was one of the Journal’s top five most read articles published in 2017. Due to its popularity, the article will be free to access during the month of February 2018. You can access the […]

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Assessment, Evaluations, and Definitions of Research Impact: A Review

Penfield, T., Baker, M.J., Scoble, R. and Wykes, M.C. (2014) Assessment, evaluations, and definitions of research impact: A review. Research Evaluation, 23(1), 21-32. https://academic.oup.com/rev/article/23/1/21/2889056 Abstract This article aims to explore what is understood by the term ‘research impact’ and to provide a comprehensive assimilation of available literature and information, drawing on global experiences to understand […]

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Social Impact of Participatory Health Research: Collaborative Non-Linear Processes of Knowledge Mobilization

Abma, T.A., Cook, T., Rämgård, M., Kleba, E., Harris, J. & Wallerstein, N. (2017) Social impact of participatory health research: Collaborative non-linear processes of knowledge mobilization. Educational Action Research, 25(4), 489-505. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09650792.2017.1329092 Abstract Social impact, defined as an effect on society, culture, quality of life, community services, or public policy beyond academia, is widely considered […]

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#ShitDavidSays About Impact #7: If Impact Occurred but No One Was There to Measure It… / #ShitDavidSays About Impact, no 6 : s’il y a un impact, mais que personne n’est là pour le mesurer…

If impact occurred but no one was there to measure it did anything ever really happen? In this 7th and final post in this series, David speaks about the importance of assessing research impacts because if we don’t how can we demonstrate the value of research to end beneficiaries? He points out the irony of […]

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#ShitDavidSays About Impact #6: Impact Is Measured at the Level of the User / #ShitDavidSays About Impact, no 6 : l’impact se mesure chez l’utilisateur

Probably the most important thing David says. Researchers don’t make impact, partners do. So why do we ask researchers to report on impact? C’est sans doute la chose la plus importante que dit David. L’impact ne se produit pas au départ, chez les chercheurs, mais à l’arrivée, chez les partenaires. Pourquoi, dans ce cas, demandons-nous […]

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#ShitDavidSays About Impact #5: Knowledge Hypocrites / Les idées de David sur l’impact, no 5 : l’hypocrisie en MdC

On February 1, 2012, David first wrote about knowledge hypocrites. The challenge that we are all knowledge hypocrites is as true today as it was almost 6 years ago. Le 1er février 2012, David signait un billet au sujet de l’hypocrisie en mobilisation des connaissances. Presque six ans plus tard, son énoncé provocant selon lequel […]

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Research Impact: A Narrative Review

Greenhalgh, T., Raferty, J., Hanney, S., & Glover, M. (2016). Research impact: A narrative review. BMC Medicine, 14(78), 1-16. https://bmcmedicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12916-016-0620-8 Abstract Impact occurs when research generates benefits (health, economic, cultural) in addition to building the academic knowledge base. Its mechanisms are complex and reflect the multiple ways in which knowledge is generated and utilised. Much […]

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#ShitDavidSays About Impact #4: Impact Frameworks Are Like Toothbrushes… / Les idées de David sur l’impact, no 4 : les cadres d’évaluation de l’impact sont comme les brosses à dents…

With thanks to Karen Ritchie, Head of Knowledge and Information, Health Improvement Scotland, who first coined this phrase. This post examines the plethora of impact frameworks and their – usually inappropriate – use. Merci à Karen Ritchie, chef du service des connaissances et de l’information de l’organisme écossais Health Improvement, qui a forgé cette métaphore. […]

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#ShitDavidSays About Impact #3: Engaged Scholarship NOT Knowledge Transfer / Les idées de David sur l’impact, no 3 : On parle d’érudition engagée, pas de transfert de connaissances

David Phipps is writing about his lessons after more than a decade of impact. This third post encourages us to engage end users/beneficiaries as we move from knowledge transfer to engaged scholarship. David Phipps partage les leçons qu’il a apprises en plus de dix ans dans le milieu de l’impact. Ce troisième billet nous incite […]

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